How To Make Your Own Dog Grooming Hammock At Home


If your dog squirms, fidgets, or just won’t stay still for any kind of grooming, you can nip that problem in the bud by finding a device that will keep your dog from moving. How can you ease the hassle of trying to control your dog while grooming it? There is an answer to what you can do. What about learning how to make a dog grooming hammock for your dog?

Here are 11 simple steps to help you DIY A Dog Grooming Hammock

  1. Find a Pattern
  2. Pet Measurement
  3. Size Details
  4. The Right Fabric
  5. Make a Pattern
  6. Leg Holes
  7. Side Hammock Flaps
  8. Reinforced Grommets
  9. S Hooks
  10. Grooming Arms
  11. Positioning your Dog

You can put your dog in the hammock and perform grooming duties and save yourself the hassle of an uncooperative animal. You want to do that without the fear of your dog squirming and fidgeting the entire time, or refusing to let you trim its nails or paws or even groom its tail, clean its eyes and ears, administer eye drops, or medicine.

Before you start making your own dog grooming hammock, there are some things you need to prepare and take note of. Read on to find out more.

How To Make A Dog Grooming Hammock DIY?

What You Need

Find a Pattern

There are many pattern suggestions online for grooming hammocks, and patterns are also available through fabric stores.

Pet Measurement

With dogs being all different sizes, you’ll want to measure your pet. While your dog is standing, measure from the center front leg (CFL) to the center rear leg (CRL).

Size Details

SizeDistance Between Front and Rear Legs
Small - 25.98" x 19.29"9.84"
Medium - 30.31" x 21.6511.81"
Large - 33.46" x 23.62"13.78"

Say the measurement is 8 inches, you’ll need a small pattern. If the distance is greater, say 13 inches, you’ll need a larger pattern.

The Right Fabric

Look for lightweight and breathable soft fabrics, preferably non-pill fleece, double layer flannel, terry cloth, microfiber or canvas. Any of these fabrics are sturdy enough for small to medium dogs, while heavier duty fabric is best for larger dogs.

Try a strong synthetic material that provides considerable comfort for your bigger dog. You want a skin-friendly fabric.

Use a sturdy fabric that has limited to no stretch to it. With too much stretch, your dog can twist or distort the hammock out of shape and you’ll end up making another one.

Make a Pattern

A larger grooming hammock requires a yard of fabric while a smaller hammock requires 3/4 of a yard. You can increase or decrease the size according to what you need.

For a larger hammock, you’ll want to place the fabric, folded in half, with the straight side toward you, which is approximately 34 inches, and the curved side away from you, which is approximately 21 inches.

For a smaller grooming hammock, you’ll want the folded straight side toward you, which is approximately 26 inches, and the curved side away from you, which is approximately 21 inches.

[Related Article: How To Make Dog Grooming Bows For Beginners]

Leg Holes

To make the 4 leg holes, you’ll want to cut them into the fabric. Make the holes fairly small as they do stretch. Reinforce the holes. Use a zig-zag stitch around the holes for reinforcement.

SINGER 00260 Clear Invisible Nylon Thread

Besides stitching around the leg holes, stitch around the entire hammock to reinforce it. When you’re stitching the hammock, use a nylon type of thread to make sure the hammock stays together.

Side Hammock Flaps

With the material that comes up the sides of the hammock, you’ll want that area to measure at least 6 inches, though this measurement is flexible.

The sides can either enwrap or enclose your pet or you can leave an opening that allows your dog to stay cool. Make it simple. Cut the fabric consistent with the design you want.

Reinforced Grommets

You’ll need reinforced grommets, four of them, to easily hang your hammock with S hooks embedded at the top of the hammock. Make sure the grommets are made from steel or brass to hold the weight of the hammock and your dog.

S Hooks

You’ll also need at least two S hooks to hang the hammock to a grooming arm or horizontal pole.

Grooming Arms

Master Equipment Aluminum Pet Grooming Arm with Clamp

You can use your grooming hammock with a grooming arm over a table or hang the hammock from a hook and chain from a ceiling joist or use reinforced straps.

Do the grooming operation in a safe and stable area with a barrier under the hammock to avoid accidents.

You can also use chains and snaps to hold the hammock in place. They are available in sizes that accommodate the size dog you are dealing with and the stability you need.

[Related Article: 3 Easy Ways To Make A Dog Grooming Table At Home]

Positioning your Dog

You want to hang your pet in the air with its head, and four feet exposed. This position is convenient when trimming nails or cleaning eyes.

With the limbs elevated, your pet is quiet and not moving which makes it advantageous for grooming.

There are many ways to DIY your own dog grooming hammock. It really depends on your creativity and some can even be done with no sewing.

Wrap Up

You can be worry-free when it comes to grooming your dog. You want to make your dog comfortable and make grooming an enjoyable experience, minus the squirming and fidgeting.

We all know that grooming a pet can be a challenge. Maybe your dog is the exception and is willing to settle down rather than fight their way the whole time you’re trying to groom them. A good grooming hammock is one answer to the dilemma.

A grooming hammock can limit your dog from struggling and keep it comfortable as well. Also, the efforts you put into grooming are less stressful and easier to accomplish with the right device.

Just make sure that when you decide to make your own grooming hammock, you assure its stability to hold your dog properly to prevent any injuries to your dog, or you. Put some fun into the grooming process with the right hammock.

Sarah Jones

Sarah is a passionate pet lover who owns several pets on her own. She loves to share her experience doing part-time writing to impart some useful tips to other pet owners.

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